#Environment: Zimbabweans Turns to God As Climate Change Disrupts Livelihoods

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AS climate change brings unexpected challenges, with frequent, severe droughts and floods, Zimbabweans are beginning to look up to God — the maker of heaven and earth — for lasting solutions, disappointed at the slow pace of human scientific interventions.

This comes as Zimbabwe this year faces what could be its worst drought in 25 years due to El Nino, the third drought in straight seasons since 2013.

At least 1,5 million Zimbabweans will go hungry in 2016, says the World Food Programme, as the drought is expected to cut harvests by wide margins.

The string of droughts has also slashed hydro-power generation at the 750 megawatt-capacity Kariba electric power plant by more than two thirds, leaving households, mines and industry in the dark for hours on end every day.

Now, Vice President Phelekezela Mphoko has rallied the local Church to beseech God’s intervention in ending the drought; extreme events we humans call “natural disasters.” Others rightly refer to such as “Acts of God,” itself a humbling-pie-eating statement.

In a key admission by political leaders of the role played by the Church in combating adverse climate change impacts, Vice President Mphoko pleaded with the Church to intercede through 7 days of nationwide prayer, which ended yesterday.

Regrettably, the UN climate negotiation system has tended to downplay this important role, resting more on a species over-confident of its capabilities and abilities, which have failed to reverse climate change in the past 25 years of talks.

And yet, the Church and scientists agree on at least one thing: that the current changes in the global climate system are man-made.

They result from mankind’s poor environmental stewardship of the earth, a God-given (forget the Big Bang Theory) garden that must be tended responsibly, says Mrs. Sarah Mwandiambira, spokeswoman, the Zimbabwe Council of Churches (ZCC).

Source: All Africa News

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